isri.org

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries is a United States-based private, non-profit trade association representing more than 1,300 private and public for-profit companies – ranging from small, family-owned businesses to multi-national corporations—operating at more than 6,000 facilities in the United States and 40 countries worldwide. Its membership is made up of manufacturers and processors, brokers and industrial consumers of scrap commodities, including ferrous and nonferrous metals, paper, electronics, rubber, plastics, glass and textiles. ISRI's associate members include equipment and service providers to the scrap recycling industry. Manufacturers and sellers of equipment and services—such as shredders, balers, cranes, cargo transporters, computer systems and more—also promote the scrap recycling industry through their membership in ISRI. More information...

Multilingual Wikipedia

In June 2020 the website isri.org was on the 85,267th place in the ranking of the most reliable and popular sources in multilingual Wikipedia from readers' point of view (PR-score). If we consider only frequency of appearance of this source in references of Wikipedia articles (F-score), this website was on the 543,275th place in June 2020. From Wikipedians' point of view, "isri.org" is the 146,289th most reliable source in different language versions of Wikipedia (AR-score).

The website is placed before waarnemen.com and after beltz.de in multilingual PR ranking of the most reliable sources in Wikipedia.

PR-score:
85,267th place
236,060
-26,968
AR-score:
146,289th place
17,279
-2,018
F-score:
543,275th place
8
0

English Wikipedia (en)

PR-score:
46,830th place
235,360
-27,268
AR-score:
72,071st place
16,679
-2,052
F-score:
257,835th place
7
0

Arabic Wikipedia (ar)

PR-score:
62,783rd place
700
+300
AR-score:
52,694th place
600
+34
F-score:
102,727th place
1
0

BestRef shows popularity and reliability scores for sources in references of Wikipedia articles in different languages. Data extraction based on complex method using Wikimedia dumps. To find the most popular and reliable sources we used information about over 200 million references of Wikipedia articles. More details...