Mani (prophet) (English Wikipedia)

Analisys of sources in references of the Wikipedia ariticle en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mani (prophet)

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iranicaonline.orgiranicaonline.org↓ (6)6581484
iranchamber.comiranchamber.com↓ (1)170406059
newadvent.orgnewadvent.org↓ (1)1362299
iranica.comiranica.com↓ (1)162857742
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books.google.combooks.google.com↓ (1)111
sydney.edu.auopenjournals.library.sydney.edu.au↓ (1)161914235
doi.orgdoi.org↓ (1)154180
bbkl.debbkl.de↓ (1)1lowlow
archive.orgarchive.org↓ (1)122
sacred-texts.comsacred-texts.com↓ (1)1634521

archive.org

bbkl.de

books.google.com

  • 16. Henning, Walter Bruno (1943). The Book of the Giants. University of London. pp. 52–74. It is noteworthy that Mani, who was brought up and spent most of his life in a province of the Persian empire, and whose mother belonged to a famous Parthian family, did not make any use of the Iranian mythological tradition. There can no longer be any doubt that the Iranian names of Sām, Narīmān, etc., that appear in the Persian and Sogdian versions of the Book of the Giants, did not figure in the original edition, written by Mani in the Syriac language.

britannica.com

doi.org

iranchamber.com

  • 1. Taraporewala, I.J.S., Manichaeism, Iran Chamber Society, retrieved 2015-01-12

iranica.com

iranicaonline.org

  • 2. SASANIAN DYNASTY, retrieved 2015-01-12
  • 5. Sundermann, Werner (2009), "Mani, the founder of the religion of Manicheism in the 3rd century AD", Iranica, Sundermann, According to the Fehrest, Mani was of Arsacid stock on both his father’s and his mother’s sides, at least if the readings al-ḥaskāniya (Mani’s father) and al-asʿāniya (Mani’s mother) are corrected to al-aškāniya and al-ašḡāniya (ed. Flügel, 1862, p. 49, ll. 2 and 3) respectively. The forefathers of Mani’s father are said to have been from Hamadan and so perhaps of Iranian origin (ed. Flügel, 1862, p. 49, 5–6). The Chinese Compendium, which makes the father a local king, maintains that his mother was from the house Jinsajian, explained by Henning as the Armenian Arsacid family of Kamsarakan (Henning, 1943, p. 52, n. 4 = 1977, II, p. 115). Is that fact, or fiction, or both? The historicity of this tradition is assumed by most, but the possibility that Mani’s noble Arsacid background is legendary cannot be ruled out (cf. Scheftelowitz, 1933, pp. 403–4). In any case, it is characteristic that Mani took pride in his origin from time-honored Babel, but never claimed affiliation to the Iranian upper class.
  • 11. "MANI – Encyclopaedia Iranica". www.iranicaonline.org. Retrieved 2019-07-19.
  • 18. Sundermann, Werner (2009), "Mani, the founder of the religion of Manicheism in the 3rd century CE", Iranica, ...his mother was from the house Jinsajian, explained by Henning as the Armenian Arsacid family of Kamsarakan.
  • 24. Mani at Encyclopædia Iranica
  • 27. Mani at Encyclopædia Iranica

newadvent.org

openjournals.library.sydney.edu.au

sacred-texts.com

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