Timeline of the history of Gibraltar (English Wikipedia)

Analisys of sources in references of the Wikipedia ariticle en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline of the history of Gibraltar

SiteHosts in references Count Global rank English rank
archive.orgweb.archive.org↓ (27), archive.org↓ (4)3122
books.google.combooks.google.com↓ (10)1011
chronicle.gichronicle.gi↓ (7)7lowlow
un.orgun.org↓ (4), unbisnet.un.org↓ (1)566103
europa.eueur-lex.europa.eu↓ (2), europa.eu↓ (1), europarl.europa.eu↓ (1)44458
gibnet.comgibnet.com↓ (4)4lowlow
gibraltar.gov.gigibraltar.gov.gi↓ (3)3lowlow
gibnews.netgibnews.net↓ (3)3lowlow
gibraltarnewsonline.comgibraltarnewsonline.com↓ (3)3lowlow
gibconnect.comgibconnect.com↓ (2)2lowlow
bbc.co.uknews.bbc.co.uk↓ (1), bbc.co.uk↓ (1)244
telegraph.co.uktelegraph.co.uk↓ (2)21815
uab.catbib.uab.cat↓ (1)152428873
gibraltar2004.gov.gigibraltar2004.gov.gi↓ (1)1lowlow
sanroque.essanroque.es↓ (1)1lowlow
british-history.ac.ukbritish-history.ac.uk↓ (1)1713444
fco.gov.ukfco.gov.uk↓ (1)138443021
incipe.orgincipe.org↓ (1)1lowlow
newadvent.orgnewadvent.org↓ (1)1362299
emergency-management.netemergency-management.net↓ (1)1lowlow
adolfhitler.wsadolfhitler.ws↓ (1)1lowlow
archive-it.orgwayback.archive-it.org↓ (1)136292423
nbcnews.comnbcnews.com↓ (1)19663
iteg.orgiteg.org↓ (1)1lowlow
rah.esdbe.rah.es↓ (1)142339900
euroweeklynews.comeuroweeklynews.com↓ (1)1lowlow
nationalgeographic.comngm.nationalgeographic.com↓ (1)1260236
about.comarchaeology.about.com↓ (1)110196
wikisource.orgen.wikisource.org↓ (1)1208420
tripadvisor.comtripadvisor.com↓ (1)158553847
theguardian.comtheguardian.com↓ (1)165
discover.gidiscover.gi↓ (1)1lowlow
mercopress.comen.mercopress.com↓ (1)154883911
express.co.ukexpress.co.uk↓ (1)1402281
sky.comnews.sky.com↓ (1)1648424
environmental-agency.gienvironmental-agency.gi↓ (1)1lowlow
esg-gib.netesg-gib.net↓ (1)1lowlow
cnn.comarchives.cnn.com↓ (1)11514
virtualtourist.comvirtualtourist.com↓ (1)1lowlow
washtimes.comwashtimes.com↓ (1)1lowlow
elpais.comenglish.elpais.com↓ (1)156353

adolfhitler.ws

archaeology.about.com

archive.org

  • 6. López de Ayala, Ignacio (1845). The History of Gibraltar: From the Earliest Period of Its Occupation by the Saracens : Comprising Details of the Numerous Conflicts for Its Possession Between the Moors and the Christians, Until Its Final Surrender in 1462 : and of Subsequent Events : with an Appendix Containing Interesting Documents. William Pickering. p. 106. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  • 6. López de Ayala, Ignacio (1845). The History of Gibraltar: From the Earliest Period of Its Occupation by the Saracens : Comprising Details of the Numerous Conflicts for Its Possession Between the Moors and the Christians, Until Its Final Surrender in 1462 : and of Subsequent Events : with an Appendix Containing Interesting Documents. William Pickering. p. 106. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  • 27. Frederick Sayer (1862). The history of Gibraltar and of its political relation to events in Europe. Saunders. p. 115. Retrieved 4 February 2011.Letter Of The Authorities To King Philip V. 115 Sire, The loyalty with which this city has served all the preceding kings, as well as your Majesty, has ever been notorious to them. In this last event, not less than on other occasions, it has endeavoured to exhibit its fidelity at the price of lives and property, which many of the inhabitants have lost in the combat; and with great honour and pleasure did they sacrifice themselves in defence of your Majesty, who may rest well assured that we who have survived (for our misfortune), had we experienced a similar fate, would have died with glory, and would not now suffer the great grief and distress of seeing your Majesty, our lord and master, dispossessed of so loyal a city. Subjects, but courageous as such, we will submit to no other government than that of your Catholic Majesty, in whose defence and service we shall pass the remainder of our lives; departing from this fortress, where, on account of the superior force of the enemy who attacked it, and the fatal chance of our not having any garrison for its defence, except a few poor and raw peasants, amounting to less than 300, we have not been able to resist the assault, as your Majesty must have already learnt from the governor or others. Our just grief allows us to notice no other fact for the information of your Majesty, but that all the inhabitants, and each singly, fulfilled their duties in their several stations; and our governor and alcalde have worked with the greatest zeal and activity, without allowing the horrors of the incessant cannonading to deter them from their duties, to which they attended personally, encouraging all with great devotion. May Divine Providence guard the royal person of your Majesty, Gibraltar, August 5th (N. S.), 1704.
  • 27. Frederick Sayer (1862). The history of Gibraltar and of its political relation to events in Europe. Saunders. p. 115. Retrieved 4 February 2011.Letter Of The Authorities To King Philip V. 115 Sire, The loyalty with which this city has served all the preceding kings, as well as your Majesty, has ever been notorious to them. In this last event, not less than on other occasions, it has endeavoured to exhibit its fidelity at the price of lives and property, which many of the inhabitants have lost in the combat; and with great honour and pleasure did they sacrifice themselves in defence of your Majesty, who may rest well assured that we who have survived (for our misfortune), had we experienced a similar fate, would have died with glory, and would not now suffer the great grief and distress of seeing your Majesty, our lord and master, dispossessed of so loyal a city. Subjects, but courageous as such, we will submit to no other government than that of your Catholic Majesty, in whose defence and service we shall pass the remainder of our lives; departing from this fortress, where, on account of the superior force of the enemy who attacked it, and the fatal chance of our not having any garrison for its defence, except a few poor and raw peasants, amounting to less than 300, we have not been able to resist the assault, as your Majesty must have already learnt from the governor or others. Our just grief allows us to notice no other fact for the information of your Majesty, but that all the inhabitants, and each singly, fulfilled their duties in their several stations; and our governor and alcalde have worked with the greatest zeal and activity, without allowing the horrors of the incessant cannonading to deter them from their duties, to which they attended personally, encouraging all with great devotion. May Divine Providence guard the royal person of your Majesty, Gibraltar, August 5th (N. S.), 1704.

archives.cnn.com

bbc.co.uk

  • 8. BBC Radio 4 (1 November 2005). "Gibraltar". The Sceptred Island: Empire. A 90 part history of the British Empire. Retrieved 16 December 2005.

bib.uab.cat

books.google.com

  • 20. George Hills (1974). Rock of contention: a history of Gibraltar. Hale. p. 165. ISBN 9780709143529. Retrieved 7 April 2011.Ormonde issued a proclamation. "They were come not to invade or conquer any part of Spain or to make any acquisitions for Her Majesty Queen Anne...but rather to deliver Spaniards from the mean subjection into which a small and corrupt party of men have brought them by delivering up that former glorious monarchy to the dominion of the perpetual enemies of it, the French" He laid particular stress on the respect that was to be shown to priests and nuns - "We have already ordered under pain of death of officers and soldiers under out command not to molest any person of what rank or quality so ever in the exercise of their religion in any manner whatsoever.
  • 21. G. T. Garratt (March 2007). Gibraltar and the Mediterranean. Lightning Source Inc. p. 44. ISBN 9781406708509. Retrieved 7 April 2011.One has but to read the books left to us by the sailors to realize the peculiar horror of the life between-decks. Cooped up there, like sardines in a tin, were several hundreds of men, gathered by force and kept together by brutality. A lower-deck was the home of every vice, every baseness and every misery
  • 22. David Francis (1 April 1975). The First Peninsular War: Seventeen-Two to Seventeen-Thirteen. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 115. ISBN 9780312292607. Retrieved 7 April 2011.But some of the sailors, before they could be recalled to their ships broke loose in the town and plundered the inhabitants
  • 24. George Hills (1974). Rock of contention: a history of Gibraltar. Hale. p. 175. ISBN 9780709143529. Retrieved 7 April 2011."Great disorders", he found, "had been committed by the boats crews that came on shore and marines; but the General Officers took great care to prevent them, by continually patrolling with their sergeants, and sending them on board their ships and punishing the marines
  • 25. Allen Andrews (1958). Proud fortress; the fighting story of Gibraltar. Evans. p. 35. Retrieved 7 April 2011.a few of them hanged as rioters after the sacking. One Englishman had to throw dice with a Dutchman to determine who should hang pour encourager les autres. They stood under the gallows and diced on a drum. The Englishman threw nine to the Dutchman's ten, and suffered execution before his mates.
  • 26. Sir William Godfrey Fothergill Jackson (1987). The Rock of the Gibraltarians: a history of Gibraltar. Farleigh Dickinson University Press. p. 99. ISBN 9780838632376. Retrieved 7 April 2011. Article V promised freedom of religion and full civil rights
  • 28. David Francis (1 April 1975). The First Peninsular War: Seventeen-Two to Seventeen-Thirteen. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 115. ISBN 9780312292607. Retrieved 7 April 2011. ...plundered the inhabitants. Partly on account of this, partly because they expected Gibraltar to be retaken soon, all the inhabitants except a very few...chose to leave
  • 29. Sir William Godfrey Fothergill Jackson (1987). The Rock of the Gibraltarians: a history of Gibraltar. Farleigh Dickinson University Press. pp. 99–100. ISBN 9780838632376. Retrieved 7 April 2011. Although Article V promised freedom or religion and full civil rights to all Spaniards who wished to stay in Habsburg Gibraltar, few decided to run the risk of remaining in the town. Fortresses changed hands quite frequently in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The English hold on Gibraltar might be only temporary. When the fortunes of war changed, the Spanish citizens would be able to re-occupy their property and rebuild their lives. ... Hesse's and Rooke's senior officers did their utmost to impose discipline, but the inhabitants worst fears were confirmed: women were insulted and outraged; Roman Catholic churches and institutions were taken over as stores and for other military purposes ...; and the whole town suffered at the hands of the ship's crew and marines who came ashore. Many bloody reprisals were taken by inhabitants before they left, bodies of murdered Englishmen and Dutchmen being thrown down wells and cesspits. By the time discipline was fully restored, few of the inhabitants wished or dared to remain.
  • 30. David Francis (1 April 1975). The First Peninsular War: Seventeen-Two to Seventeen-Thirteen. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 115. ISBN 9780312292607. Retrieved 7 April 2011. So the damage was done and the chance of winning the adherence of the Andalusians was lost.
  • 31. Sir William Godfrey Fothergill Jackson (1987). The Rock of the Gibraltarians: a history of Gibraltar. Farleigh Dickinson University Press. p. 100. ISBN 9780838632376. Retrieved 7 April 2011.

british-history.ac.uk

chronicle.gi

dbe.rah.es

discover.gi

emergency-management.net

en.mercopress.com

  • 112. [6] Gibraltar: Between a Rock and a hard place

en.wikisource.org

english.elpais.com

environmental-agency.gi

esg-gib.net

eur-lex.europa.eu

europa.eu

europarl.europa.eu

euroweeklynews.com

express.co.uk

fco.gov.uk

  • 77. [1] Archived 24 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine Country Profile: Gibraltar (British Overseas Territory) "On 18 September 2006, the first Trilateral Ministerial meeting was held at the Palacio de Viana in Cordoba. Mr Geoff Hoon, Minister for Europe, represented the UK, while Foreign Minister Moratinos and Chief Minister Peter Caruana represented Spain and Gibraltar respectively. At the meeting, a landmark agreement was reached on a range of issues. These included: telecommunications; the expanded use of Gibraltar Airport; the improvement of pedestrian and traffic flows at the border crossing between Gibraltar and Spain; and a settlement on pensions that would provide a fair deal for those Spanish citizens who lost their livelihoods when the border between Spain and Gibraltar closed in 1969."

gibconnect.com

gibnet.com

  • 14. Joe Bossano (1994). "The Fight for Self – Determination. Joe Bossano at the United Nations". Gibraltar... The unofficial homepage. Reference Documents about Gibraltar and its political struggles. Archived from the original on 15 December 2005. Retrieved 16 December 2005.
  • 78. [2] Communique of the ministerial meeting of the forum of dialogue on Gibraltar 18 09 2006 "More fluid movement of people, vehicles and goods between Gibraltar and the surrounding area will improve the day to day lives of people in Gibraltar and the Campo de Gibraltar. The Spanish Government, through the Agencia Estatal de Administración Tributaria, is already investing close to one and a half million euros in substantial improvement works to its facilities and those of the Guardia Civil. The works will be completed this year, at which time the access will operate on a two lane basis in both directions and the red/green channels system, for both people and for vehicles, will be introduced. The Gibraltar Government has also invested substantial sums of money on the enhancement of its facilities. "
  • 94. Committee of Observers (December 2002). "Gibraltar Referendum Observers Report" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2006. Retrieved 20 January 2006.
  • 98. Tripartite Agreement announced 18 September 2006

gibnews.net

gibraltar.gov.gi

gibraltar2004.gov.gi

  • 15. David Eade (2004). "1704 and all that". Celebrating 300 Years of British Gibraltar (Tercentenary Web Site). Government Tercentenary Office, Gibraltar Government. Archived from the original on 15 December 2005. Retrieved 16 December 2005.

gibraltarnewsonline.com

incipe.org

iteg.org

nbcnews.com

  • 4. Choi, Charles (2006). "Gibraltar". NBC News. Retrieved 8 January 2010.

newadvent.org

news.bbc.co.uk

news.sky.com

ngm.nationalgeographic.com

  • 3. "National Geographic – Last of the Neanderthals". Archived from the original on 3 September 2009. Retrieved 29 December 2009.

sanroque.es

telegraph.co.uk

theguardian.com

tripadvisor.com

  • 79. [3] Gibraltar: Crossing the Border

un.org

unbisnet.un.org

virtualtourist.com

washtimes.com

wayback.archive-it.org

web.archive.org

BestRef shows popularity and reliability scores for sources in references of Wikipedia articles in different languages. Data extraction based on complex method using Wikimedia dumps. To find the most popular and reliable sources we used information about over 200 million references of Wikipedia articles. More details...

Useful links: