Puerto Rico (English Wikipedia)

Analisys of sources in references of the Wikipedia ariticle en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto Rico

SiteHosts in references Count Global rank English rank
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portoftheamericas.comportoftheamericas.com↓ (1)1lowlow
rio2016.comrio2016.com↓ (1)122741638
epa.gov19january2017snapshot.epa.gov↓ (1)1493364

19january2017snapshot.epa.gov

2009-2017.state.gov

3snn221qaymolkgbj4a0vpey-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com

abcnews.go.com

academiajurisprudenciapr.org

acueductospr.com

api.semanticscholar.org

arago.si.edu

archive.org

archive.today

avalon.law.yale.edu

bahaipr.org

  • 231. "Home". Bahá'ís of Puerto Rico.

baseballhall.org

bbc.co.uk

books.google.com

boricuasballers.com

britannica.com

buddhanet.net

  • 233. "Budda Net". Buddhanet.net. Retrieved 6 February 2011.

businessdestinations.com

bvirtualogp.pr.gov

canada.com

caribbeanbusinesspr.com

caselaw.findlaw.com

census.gov

ceterisparibusuprm.org

charma.uprm.edu

cheverote.com

cia.gov

cienciapr.org

clerk.house.gov

cnbc.com

cnn.com

coastalhazards.uprm.edu

crf-usa.org

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).

cruisehive.com

data.census.gov

data.worldbank.org

databank.worldbank.org

dealbook.nytimes.com

democracynow.org

doi.gov

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).

doi.org

drive.google.com

eagleforum.org

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).

earthquake.usgs.gov

edition.cnn.com

efe.com

elecciones2020.ceepur.org

electionspuertorico.org

elnuevodia.com

elvocero.com

en.wikisource.org

english.turkcebilgi.com

ensayistas.org

episcopalpr.org

estadisticas.gobierno.pr

facebook.com

factfinder.census.gov

fam.state.gov

  • 1. "7 fam 1120 acquisition of u.s. nationality in u.s. territories and possessions". U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 7- Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State. 3 January 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 13 December 2015.
  • 237. "U.S. Department of State. Foreign Affairs Manual: Volume 7 – Consular Affairs (7 FAM 1120), 'Acquisition of U.S. Nationality in U.S. Territories and Possessions', pp. 1–3". Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 13 December 2015.

fas.org

fbi.gov

fcc.gov

fec.gov

findarticles.com

foxnews.com

ft.com

fullbooks.com

gao.gov

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 24. PUERTO RICO: Fiscal Relations with the Federal Government and Economic Trends during the Phaseout of the Possessions Tax Credit. General Accounting Office publication number GAO-06-541. US Gen. Acctg. Office, Washington, DC. 19 May 2006. Public Release: 23 June 2006. (Note: All residents of Puerto Rico pay federal taxes, with the exception of federal income taxes which only some residents of Puerto Rico must still pay).
  • 336. "GAO-13-260, Puerto Rico: Characteristics of the Island's Maritime Trade and Potential Effects of Modifying the Jones Act" (PDF). United States Government Accountability Office. March 2013.

gdb-pur.com

gdbpr.com

genographic.nationalgeographic.com

globalpressjournal.com

globalreligiousfutures.org

gobierno.pr

gorp.com

graduados.uprrp.edu

grupocne.org

havenscenter.org

heritage.org

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 254. Schaefer, Brett. "The Heritage Foundation, 11 March 2009. "D.C. Voting Rights: No Representation? No Taxation!", By Robert A. Book, PhD". Heritage.org. Retrieved 16 October 2010.

hispanicmarketinfo.com

history.house.gov

  • 37. "Crafting an Identity". History, Art & Archives. Office of the Historian and the Clerk of the House's Office of Art and Archives. Retrieved 27 July 2016.

htrcpa.com

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).

huffingtonpost.com

icesi.edu.co

iiie.net

imf.org

independencia.net

insightcrime.org

irs.gov

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 252. "Internal Revenue Service. ', Topic 903 – Federal Employment Tax in Puerto Rico'". Irs.gov. 18 December 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2010.
  • 258. "Table 5. Internal Revenue Gross Collections, by Type of Tax and State, Fiscal year 2009" (XLS). Internal Revenue Service.

islands.unep.ch

issuu.com

jct.gov

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 256. "Joint Committee on Taxation. An Overview of the Special Tax Rules Related to Puerto Rico and an Analysis of the Tax and Economic Policy Implications of Recent Legislative Options" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 September 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2010.

jewishvirtuallibrary.org

joc.com

jpost.com

ketv.com

lacomunidad.elpais.com

laht.com

languageeducationpolicy.org

latinamericanstudies.org

latinousa.org

law.cornell.edu

legislink.org

  • 39. To change the name of the island of Porto Rico to Puerto Rico, S.J. Res 36, 72nd Congress, enacted 1932. (47 Stat. 158)

let.rug.nl

lexjuris.com

linktopr.com

llmc.com

loc.gov

luxner.com

maps.ngdc.noaa.gov

mcvpr.com

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 255. "Puerto Rico Manufacturers Association, CEO Summit, Federal and Local Incentives: Where we are, Where We Want to be. Amaya Iraolagoitia, Partner, Tax Dept" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 May 2011. Retrieved 14 August 2010.

members.dandy.net

mercer.com

metro.pr

mlis.state.md.us

msn.com

nationalgeographic.com

nbclatino.com

nbcnews.com

newberry.org

newdeal.feri.org

news.bbc.co.uk

newyorkfed.org

nhc.noaa.gov

  • 156. Berg, Robbie (20 September 2017). "Hurricane Maria". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 20 September 2017.

nl.edu

nla.gov.au

  • 173. "PUERTO RICO". Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916). 28 April 1898. Retrieved 29 October 2019.

noticel.com

notiuno.com

nowdata.rcc-acis.org

npr.org

nsarchive.gwu.edu

nytimes.com

oceanexplorer.noaa.gov

online.wsj.com

orthodoxchurchpr.org

oslpr.org

parish.orthodoxtheologicalinstitute.org

  • 219. "Welcome". Parish.orthodoxtheologicalinstitute.org. Archived from the original on 4 March 2011. Retrieved 25 November 2012.

parma.org

pbs.org

periodicolaperla.com

  • 357. Sánchez Martínez, Héctor (20 January 2017). "¿Tenemos o no un ave nacional?" [Do we or do we not have a national bird?] (in Spanish). La Perla del Sur. Retrieved 16 March 2021.

pewforum.org

pewhispanic.org

  • 215. LÓPEZ, Gustavo (15 September 2015). "Hispanics of Puerto Rican Origin in the United States, 2013". Pew Research. Pew Research Center, DC. Retrieved 17 February 2017. Puerto Ricans in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Puerto Rican origin; this means either they themselves were born in Puerto Rico1 or they were born in the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia or elsewhere, but trace their family ancestry to Puerto Rico.

pewresearch.org

pharmaceuticalonline.com

policy.house.gov

portoftheamericas.com

prairieschooltraveler.com

  • 223. "Korber House". Prairieschooltraveler.com. Retrieved 6 February 2011.

preb.com

presupuesto.gobierno.pr

prfaa.com

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 260. "News & Media". PRFAA. 6 July 2009. Archived from the original on 11 May 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011.

prfaa.pr.gov

primerahora.com

proyectosalonhogar.com

  • 34. "Historia de Puerto Rico". Proyectosalonhogar.com. Retrieved 14 April 2014.
  • 75. [1] Retrieved: 8 January 2015. Carta Autonómica de Puerto Rico, 1897.

prpa.gobierno.pr

puertoricanmusictv.com

puertorico-herald.org

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 119. "On The Nature of Commonwealth V". Puertorico-herald.org. Retrieved 30 October 2011.
  • 120. "Let Puerto Rico Decide How to end its Colony Status: True Nationhood Stands on the Pillar of Independence". Rosalinda de Jesus. The Allentown Morning Call. Republished by the Puerto Rico Herald. July 21, 2002. San Juan, Puerto Rico. Retrieved June 21, 2012.

puertoricoadvancement.org

puertoricousa.com

pupr.edu

query.nytimes.com

ramajudicial.pr

raquelrosario.net

redsismica.uprm.edu

refworld.org

religiousintelligence.co.uk

remezcla.com

reuters.com

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 253. "Reuters, 'Puerto Rico hopes to gain from U.S. healthcare reform', 24 September 2009". Reuters. 24 September 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2010.
  • 259. Puerto Rico hopes to gain from U.S. healthcare reform. Archived 16 October 2015 at the Wayback Machine Reuters. 24 September 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2012.

rio2016.com

rollingstone.com

saudiaramcoworld.com

search.proquest.com

  • 95. "Porto Rico En Fete: President's Auto Tour Amid Shower of Roses: He Promises Citizenship". The Washington Post. 22 November 1906. p. 1. ProQuest 144628701.

sec.gov

sercc.com

skift.com

  • 294. "Culture Is Central in Puerto Rico's New Marketing Campaign". Skift. 24 April 2019. Retrieved 27 November 2019. In creating the site, the team added photos, videos and information about all of the 78 municipalities of Puerto Rico, in an effort to draw people away from San Juan, and into lesser-known areas.

smithsonianmag.com

socialsecurity.gov

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).

solboricua.com

sports.espn.go.com

stanford.wellsphere.com

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).
  • 250. "Puerto Ricans pay import/export taxes". Stanford.wellsphere.com. Archived from the original on 1 April 2010. Retrieved 14 August 2010.
  • 251. "Puerto Ricans pay federal commodity taxes". Stanford.wellsphere.com. Archived from the original on 1 April 2010. Retrieved 30 October 2011.

starherald.com

taino-tribe.org

telemundopr.com

thefiscaltimes.com

theguardian.com

thehill.com

thomas.gov

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).

topuertorico.org

treasury.gov

triblive.com

ucr.fbi.gov

ui.adsabs.harvard.edu

un.org

usatoday.com

uscannenbergmedia.com

usconstitution.net

valerosos.com

viahero.com

vocero.com

vox.com

washingtonpost.com

wayback.archive-it.org

weather.com

web.archive.org

webcitation.org

  • 25. Contrary to common misconception, residents of Puerto Rico do pay U.S. federal taxes: customs taxes (which are subsequently returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury) (see Dept of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs. DOI.gov Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine), import/export taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com Archived 1 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine), federal commodity taxes (see Stanford.wellsphere.com ), social security taxes (see IRS.gov), etc. Residents pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security (see IRS.gov) and Medicare (see Reuters.com), as well as Commonwealth of Puerto Rico income taxes (see Puertorico-herald.org and HTRCPA.com Archived 29 April 2011 at the Wayback Machine). All federal employees (see Heritage.org Archived 10 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine), those who do business with the federal government (see MCVPR.com Archived 16 January 2010 at WebCite), Puerto Rico-based corporations that intend to send funds to the U.S. (see p. 9, line 1. Archived 3 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine), and some others (For example, Puerto Rican residents that are members of the U.S. military, see Heritage.org; and Puerto Rico residents who earned income from sources outside Puerto Rico, see pp 14–15. also pay federal income taxes). In addition, because the cutoff point for income taxation is lower than that of the U.S. IRS code, and because the per-capita income in Puerto Rico is much lower than the average per-capita income on the mainland, more Puerto Rico residents pay income taxes to the local taxation authority than if the IRS code were applied to the island. This occurs because "the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico government has a wider set of responsibilities than do U.S. State and local governments" (see GAO.gov).

    As residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, Puerto Ricans are eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement, but are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents, unlike residents of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and residents of the 50 States, do not receive the SSI; see Socialsecurity.gov), and the island actually receives less than 15% of the Medicaid funding it would normally receive if it were a U.S. state. Additionally, Medicare providers receive less-than-full state-like reimbursements for services rendered to beneficiaries in Puerto Rico, even though the latter paid fully into the system (see p 252. Archived 11 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine). In general, "many federal social welfare programs have been extended to Puerto Rico residents, although usually with caps inferior to those allocated to the states." (The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion: 1803–1898. By Sanford Levinson and Bartholomew H. Sparrow. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. 2005. Page 167. For a comprehensive coverage of federal programs made extensive to Puerto Rico, see Richard Cappalli's Federal Aid to Puerto Rico (1970).)

    It has also been estimated (see Egleforum.org) that, because the population of the Island is greater than that of 50% of the States, if it were a state, Puerto Rico would have six to eight seats in the House, in addition to the two seats in the Senate. (See Eagleforum.org, CRF-USA.org Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine and Thomas.gov Archived 1 February 2016 at the Wayback Machine. For the later, the official U.S. Congress database website, a query must be resubmitted. The document in question is called "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007." These are the steps to follow to submit a query: > Committee Reports > 110 > drop down "Word/Phrase" and pick "Report Number" > type "597" next to Report Number. This will provide the document "House Report 110-597 – 2007". Then, from the Table of Contents choose "Background and need for legislation".) Another misconception is that the import/export taxes collected by the U.S. on products manufactured in Puerto Rico are all returned to the Puerto Rico Treasury. This is not the case. Such import/export taxes are returned only for rum products and, even then, the US Treasury keeps a portion of those taxes (see the "House Report 110-597 – Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007" mentioned above).

webpub.allegheny.edu

welcome.topuertorico.org

worldatlas.com

www2.census.gov

www2.pr.gov

www2.scholastic.com

www3.weforum.org

yale.edu

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