Internet (English Wikipedia)

Analysis of information sources in references of the Wikipedia article "Internet" in English language version.

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a4ai.org

about.com

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bitsavers.org

  • F. J. Corbató, et al., The Compatible Time-Sharing System A Programmer's Guide (MIT Press, 1963) ISBN 978-0-262-03008-3. "To establish the context of the present work, it is informative to trace the development of time-sharing at MIT. Shortly after the first paper on time-shared computers by C. Strachey at the June 1959 UNESCO Information Processing conference, H.M. Teager and J. McCarthy delivered an unpublished paper "Time-Shared Program Testing" at the August 1959 ACM Meeting."

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economist.com

  • "The internet's fifth man". The Economist. 30 November 2013. ISSN 0013-0613. Archived from the original on 19 April 2020. Retrieved 22 April 2020. In the early 1970s Mr Pouzin created an innovative data network that linked locations in France, Italy and Britain. Its simplicity and efficiency pointed the way to a network that could connect not just dozens of machines, but millions of them. It captured the imagination of Dr Cerf and Dr Kahn, who included aspects of its design in the protocols that now power the internet.

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elk.informatik.hs-augsburg.de

  • by Vinton Cerf, as told to Bernard Aboba (1993). "How the Internet Came to Be". Archived from the original on 26 September 2017. Retrieved 25 September 2017. We began doing concurrent implementations at Stanford, BBN, and University College London. So effort at developing the Internet protocols was international from the beginning.

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  • Nam, Nguyen (10 January 2023). "Kiểm tra ip". Retrieved 21 December 2023.

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ourworldindata.org

  • Ritchie, Hannah; Roser, Max (2 October 2017). "Technology Adoption". Our World in Data. Archived from the original on 12 October 2019. Retrieved 12 October 2019.

oxforddictionaries.com

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  • Cerf, V.; Kahn, R. (1974). "A Protocol for Packet Network Intercommunication" (PDF). IEEE Transactions on Communications. 22 (5): 637–648. doi:10.1109/TCOM.1974.1092259. ISSN 1558-0857. Archived (PDF) from the original on 13 September 2006. The authors wish to thank a number of colleagues for helpful comments during early discussions of international network protocols, especially R. Metcalfe, R. Scantlebury, D. Walden, and H. Zimmerman; D. Davies and L. Pouzin who constructively commented on the fragmentation and accounting issues; and S. Crocker who commented on the creation and destruction of associations.

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w3.org

  • "HTML 4.01 Specification". World Wide Web Consortium. Archived from the original on 6 October 2008. Retrieved 13 August 2008. [T]he link (or hyperlink, or Web link) [is] the basic hypertext construct. A link is a connection from one Web resource to another. Although a simple concept, the link has been one of the primary forces driving the success of the Web.
  • Berners-Lee, Tim. "The Original HTTP as defined in 1991". W3C.org. Archived from the original on 5 June 1997.

w3techs.com

washingtonpost.com

  • "A Flaw in the Design". The Washington Post. 30 May 2015. Archived from the original on 8 November 2020. Retrieved 20 February 2020. The Internet was born of a big idea: Messages could be chopped into chunks, sent through a network in a series of transmissions, then reassembled by destination computers quickly and efficiently. Historians credit seminal insights to Welsh scientist Donald W. Davies and American engineer Paul Baran. ... The most important institutional force ... was the Pentagon's Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) ... as ARPA began work on a groundbreaking computer network, the agency recruited scientists affiliated with the nation's top universities.
  • Harris, Michael (2 January 2015). "Book review: 'The Internet Is Not the Answer' by Andrew Keen". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 20 January 2015. Retrieved 25 January 2015.

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  • "Press". YouTube. Archived from the original on 11 November 2017. Retrieved 19 August 2020.

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